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The Container Project

Infinity room about climate protection

Deforested rainforests, cruel animal husbandry, drought, floods and polluted oceans: so surreal, so far away? The daily flood of compact information dulls our sensibilities. The horror scenarios are happening somewhere and rarely directly affect our own living environment.
“VideoArt4Future” is the prelude to a longer-term environmental protection art project that is to make stops throughout Germany. Betty Mü draws attention to the problem of environmental destruction with impressive and highly aesthetic images.

The art space is a container that can be flexibly placed anywhere, in which people and their environment merge: the visitors with the images they view, as well as the people on the video images with the container wall. In a mirrored “infinity room”, the mirror is held up to the viewer. Nothing stands alone, in the end everything is one. “VideoArt4Future” evokes mixed feelings and burns itself into the consciousness of the viewer. There is not much time left to act if the earth is to endure a few more generations. “After me the Sintflut”: not an option for Betty Mü.

 

Expansion of consciousness in the container

In a darkened container, which is completely covered inside with aludibond mirrors, a video of about three minutes runs as an endless loop: Images of landscapes and people created and manipulated with the help of Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning (GAN). At the center is the question “What did you do for the climate back then?”. Betty Mü uses an appeal via her social media channels as well as compiled statements from the echo chamber of the internet and lets them collide in a polarizing way. Disturbing images of pollution, ignorance and waste meet the alternative of an intact world. What can still be saved? The countdown is on. “The viewer is part of the installation and stands in the middle of a space that mirrors itself again and again. The mind-expanding effect detaches the visitor from his primary reality and draws him into the depths of his psychedelic sensory world,” says Betty Mü. Ideally, the stay in her container leads to questioning one’s own behavior patterns – and to changing them.

The container is self-sufficiently supplied with solar energy from environmentally friendly molten salt batteries, provided by the company ION Energy (manufacturer of the Baeriesystem), and the photovoltaic system of PV TOTAL (premium partner of Solarwatt).

Kindly supported by the Cultural Department of the City of Munich and the Urban Development Program “Social Cohesion” with funds from the Federal Government and the Free State of Bavaria.

Information about the art project as well as suggestions for climate and environmental protection:

www.videoart4future.com

Information on the accompanying program:
www.stadtsanierung-moosach.de

Location

Moosacher St.-Martins-Platz / Munich

Date
Category
Exhibition, Videomapping